Is a tummy tuck painful? Could I die from the procedure?

ANSWERS FROM DOCTORS (9)


Answered by Laser Lipo & Vein Center

There is some discomfort recovering from a tummy tuck, and it is most pronounced in the first week after the surgery. The discomfort generally decreases as time goes by and can last for a couple months. There is a very small risk of death from a tummy tuck/abdominoplasty with modern anesthesia and surgical techniques.

Published on Dec 12, 2018

Answered by Laser Lipo & Vein Center (View Profile)

There is some discomfort recovering from a tummy tuck, and it is most pronounced in the first week after the surgery. The discomfort generally decreases as time goes by and can last for a couple months. There is a very small risk of death from a tummy tuck/abdominoplasty with modern anesthesia and surgical techniques.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by The Institute of Aesthetic Surgery

Tummy tucks do come with a certain amount of postoperative discomfort. Most patients will compare it to that of a C-section.

As with any surgery, there is a risk of death. While not significant, this is always a consideration. It is for this reason that a thorough medical history should be taken, and your health should be optimized prior to any elective procedure.

Discuss your concerns with a board-certified plastic surgeon (ABPS).

Published on Dec 10, 2018

Answered by The Institute of Aesthetic Surgery (View Profile)

Tummy tucks do come with a certain amount of postoperative discomfort. Most patients will compare it to that of a C-section.

As with any surgery, there is a risk of death. While not significant, this is always a consideration. It is for this reason that a thorough medical history should be taken, and your health should be optimized prior to any elective procedure.

Discuss your concerns with a board-certified plastic surgeon (ABPS).

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Stephen Greenberg, MD

Everybody's pain tolerance is different. I typically see my patients do very well with this procedure with proper postoperative pain management. Every surgery that we undergo there is always potential for risk. These risk rates tend to be on the lower side.

Published on Dec 06, 2018

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Answered by Stephen Greenberg, MD

Everybody's pain tolerance is different. I typically see my patients do very well with this procedure with proper postoperative pain management. Every surgery that we undergo there is always potential for risk. These risk rates tend to be on the lower side.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Barry J. Kaplan, D.O.

Expect soreness and discomfort for 2-4 weeks, but shouldn't be severe pain. One could die from any procedure, mainly due to complications of anesthesia. We do all of our surgeries using local tumescent anesthesia.

Published on Jun 03, 2016

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Answered by Barry J. Kaplan, D.O.

Expect soreness and discomfort for 2-4 weeks, but shouldn't be severe pain. One could die from any procedure, mainly due to complications of anesthesia. We do all of our surgeries using local tumescent anesthesia.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Edward Domanskis M.D.

A tummy tuck is more painful than many procedures that I do because I am tightening the rectus muscles to narrow the waistline. I do use a long-acting anesthetic to make the pain less and can use a pain pump also. The recovery is very similar to a C-section recovery. Unfortunately, with almost any surgery, there can be complications, but they are very rare.

Published on Apr 15, 2016

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Answered by Edward Domanskis M.D.

A tummy tuck is more painful than many procedures that I do because I am tightening the rectus muscles to narrow the waistline. I do use a long-acting anesthetic to make the pain less and can use a pain pump also. The recovery is very similar to a C-section recovery. Unfortunately, with almost any surgery, there can be complications, but they are very rare.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Jed Horowitz, M.D., F.A.C.S.

Death is very, very, very rare following a tummy tuck. In fact, you are more likely to die crossing the street or being in a car accident. Exparel is a long-acting injectable medicine like novacaine that we use at the end of the case to alleviate discomfort.

Published on Mar 15, 2016

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Answered by Jed Horowitz, M.D., F.A.C.S.

Death is very, very, very rare following a tummy tuck. In fact, you are more likely to die crossing the street or being in a car accident. Exparel is a long-acting injectable medicine like novacaine that we use at the end of the case to alleviate discomfort.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Larry Leverett, MD, FACS

Pain secondary to an abdominoplasty is from the muscle tightening. If one only removes skin, it is minimally tender. But the muscle corsett is the factor that really narrows the waist so it is nearly always performed. Exparel significantly lowers the intensity of the post op discomfort.

Death from Abdominoplasty is very rare. It may occur if the patient is improperly screened/selected. Sick patients who pose significant risks are not good candidates for abdominoplasty. Furthermore, if one does "too much" she also increases her risks for catastrophic outcomes.
Pulmonary emboli (clots in the lungs) are rare, potentially catastrophic, and a prophylaxed against with anti-clotting medications.

Published on Mar 07, 2016

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Answered by Larry Leverett, MD, FACS

Pain secondary to an abdominoplasty is from the muscle tightening. If one only removes skin, it is minimally tender. But the muscle corsett is the factor that really narrows the waist so it is nearly always performed. Exparel significantly lowers the intensity of the post op discomfort.

Death from Abdominoplasty is very rare. It may occur if the patient is improperly screened/selected. Sick patients who pose significant risks are not good candidates for abdominoplasty. Furthermore, if one does "too much" she also increases her risks for catastrophic outcomes.
Pulmonary emboli (clots in the lungs) are rare, potentially catastrophic, and a prophylaxed against with anti-clotting medications.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Ralph M. Rosato, M.D., F.A.C.S.

It is similar to the discomfort of a C-section. All surgeries have risks and potential complications. If you are in good health and your surgery is being monitored by a anesthesiologist in a licensed facility your risk should be very low. Your surgeon will be able to better inform you of the risks.

Published on Mar 07, 2016

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Answered by Ralph M. Rosato, M.D., F.A.C.S.

It is similar to the discomfort of a C-section. All surgeries have risks and potential complications. If you are in good health and your surgery is being monitored by a anesthesiologist in a licensed facility your risk should be very low. Your surgeon will be able to better inform you of the risks.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Mark E. Mason, MD, FACS

Yes, and yes.

Abdominoplasty is not for the faint of heart! The abdominal wall is surgically repaired, and since this is your core, soreness and fatigue is common for weeks after surgery.

To be fair, you could die from any surgery, and you could also die from getting behind your steering wheel and driving to work. If the surgery is performed by a board-certified plastic surgeon, and you have an anesthesiologist performing general anesthesia, you will greatly decrease risks of complications. In addition, your BMI ought to be within normal limits, and the fewer pre-existing medical conditions you have, the lower your risks are for complications. Getting out of bed and walking as soon as possible helps decrease risk of a blood clot.

I would recommend an in-person consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon in your area to review your specific risks. Even with all risks considered, it is a very safe procedure that delivers high satisfaction results. There is no way you can get rid of excess skin with diet or exercise; abdominoplasty is the only option. Best of luck!

Published on Feb 24, 2016

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Answered by Mark E. Mason, MD, FACS

Yes, and yes.

Abdominoplasty is not for the faint of heart! The abdominal wall is surgically repaired, and since this is your core, soreness and fatigue is common for weeks after surgery.

To be fair, you could die from any surgery, and you could also die from getting behind your steering wheel and driving to work. If the surgery is performed by a board-certified plastic surgeon, and you have an anesthesiologist performing general anesthesia, you will greatly decrease risks of complications. In addition, your BMI ought to be within normal limits, and the fewer pre-existing medical conditions you have, the lower your risks are for complications. Getting out of bed and walking as soon as possible helps decrease risk of a blood clot.

I would recommend an in-person consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon in your area to review your specific risks. Even with all risks considered, it is a very safe procedure that delivers high satisfaction results. There is no way you can get rid of excess skin with diet or exercise; abdominoplasty is the only option. Best of luck!

Published on Jul 11, 2012


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